CASMI 2017 results are out

CASMI (Critical Assessment of Small Molecule Identification) 2017 results are finally out! Kai participated with SIRIUS/CSI:FingerID, and won categories 1 (Best Structure Identification on Natural Products), 2 (Best Automatic Structural Identification – In Silico Fragmentation Only), and 4 (Best Automatic Candidate Ranking). He did not participate in category 3.

For category 4 (in silico methods for searching in molecular structure databases), CSI:FingerID correctly identified 66 of 198 compounds (33.3%). This is more than 6-fold of what the best non-CSI:FingerID contestant reached. (Submissions containing “IOKR” in their name, correspond to different variants of the Input Output Kernel Regression version of CSI:FingerID.)

Unfortunately, CASMI 2017 data did not include isotope patterns. It appears that in many cases, SIRIUS was not able to find the correct molecular formula among the top candidate. This resulted in several cases where the correct structure was excluded due to the “wrong” molecular formula. We will investigate how many compounds would have been correctly identified if isotope pattern data would have been available.

Meet Kai and Marcus at Metabolomics 2017

Kai and Marcus will give talks at Metabolomics conference 2017 in Brisbane on Wed, June 28th.
Kai will talk about CANOPUS, the new tool for compound category prediction. Marcus will discuss ZODIAC, a method for comprehensive molecular formula identification on complete LC/MS runs with tandem mass spectra.

SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID 3.5 released

Our new version, Sirius 3.5, comes with several advancements. Download and use it here.
We have a new overview tab for CSI:FingerID hits which displays results of structure search for multiple molecular formulas.
You can examine the predicted fingerprint of each compound (and molecular formula) independently of any database.
We now offer the possibility to create and search in custom structure databases.
Besides, we have a new bayesian networks scoring function for CSI:FingerID which considers dependencies between different molecular properties.
This and much more.

SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID 3.4 released

A new Sirius version is available. We included new features to enable a more intuitive workflow. We hope you’ll like it. Download and use it here.
We provide element prediction using isotope pattern. CSI:FingerID now predicts more molecular properties which improves structure identification.
Besides we fundamentally changed the structure of the result output generated by the command line tool to its final version. This means you might have to adjust  your workflow.

 

 

 

SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID for Mac OSX

SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID is no available for Mac. You can download it here. A few highlights of the new version:

  • Searching your tandem mass spectra in molecular databases using CSI:FingerId
  • Restrict the SIRIUS molecular formula identification to formulas appearing in molecular databases – or search through the whole space of possible formulas. It’s up to you.
  • Sort you identification results by confidence such that more reliable identifications (e.g. from high quality spectra or easy recognizable compounds) are separated from bogus identifications.
  • Predict structural features and substructures from tandem mass spectra and visualize them in your candidate structure list.

Don’t hesitate to give us your feedback, report bugs or suggesting new features. Just write to ed.an1511046697ej-in1511046697u.vre1511046697stsil1511046697@leve1511046697d-sui1511046697ris1511046697

SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID release

SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID leaves the alpha state. You can download it here. A few highlights of the new version:

  • Searching your tandem mass spectra in molecular databases using CSI:FingerID
  • Restrict the SIRIUS molecular formula identification to formulas appearing in molecular databases – or search through the whole space of possible formulas. It’s up to you.
  • Sort you identification results by confidence such that more reliable identifications (e.g. from high quality spectra or easy recognizable compounds) are separated from bogus identifications.
  • Predict structural features and substructures from tandem mass spectra and visualize them in your candidate structure list.

Don’t hesitate to give us your feedback, report bugs or suggesting new features. Just write to ed.an1511046697ej-in1511046697u.vre1511046697stsil1511046697@leve1511046697d-sui1511046697ris1511046697

SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID alpha release

The CASMI winner methods SIRIUS and CSI:FingerID are now available as a user interface. This allows users to batch process their spectra; which was not possible for the web application of CSI:FingerID.

You can try an early alpha version of SIRIUS+CSI:FingerID here.

Within the next three weeks we will release the final 3.1.4 version. Please report bugs to ed.an1511046697ej-in1511046697u.vre1511046697stsil1511046697@leve1511046697d-sui1511046697ris1511046697.

Meet us at Metabolomics 2016

Kai, Franziska and Marcus are visiting the Metabolomics in Dublin from Monday, 27 June 2016 to Thursday, 30 June 2016.

Franziska is giving a talk on  the Significance of metabolite identifications from searching mass spectral libraries.
Marcus will speak about our new Confidence score for CSI:FingerID identifications.
Kai will present the new SIRIUS 3.2 release.

CSI:FingerID: Best automated method in CASMI contest

CSI:FingerID participated in this year’s CASMI (Critical Assessment of Small Molecule Identification) contest for automated methods identifying compounds solely by mass spectral data without additional meta data (category 2). IOKR, the new prediction method within CSI:FingerID, won this category. Standard CSI:FingerId prediction method ranked 2nd best. For positive ionization, CSI:FingerID identified more than twice as much compounds than any other method.

We are pleased that SIRIUS and CSI:FingerID were successfully used by many other contestants in category 1.

You can try CSI:FingerID on http://www.csi-fingerid.org/. A commandline version as well as a user interface which allows batch processing of MS/MS data will be released soon. We will also integrate the new IOKR prediction method into the CSI:FingerID web interface.

Gastvorlesung Sebastian in Halle

Sebastian wird am Montag den 25.01.2016 zwei Vorlesungen zum Thema “Genome Rearrangements und Gene Clusters” an der Universität Halle halten.

Die Vorlesungen finden von 10:15 bis 12:00 Uhr in Seminarraum 1.30 sowie von 14:00 Uhr bis 15:15 Uhr in Seminarraum 0.04 des Institut für Informatik (Von-Seckendorff-Platz 1, Halle) statt.

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